Inspirations
Inspirations
+
micdotcom:

New York Comic Con is taking an awesome stand against sexual harassment
Follow micdotcom 
+
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
instagram:

Rediscovering Backyard Magic with @joshuadwhite

For more photos from Joshua’s A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard, follow @joshuadwhite on Instagram.

“A lot of my work has to do with memory,” explains North Carolina photographer Joshua White (@joshuadwhite). After capturing a photo of a freshly fallen whirligig on a solid-colored trash can, Joshua became intrigued by the way the seedpod’s shape stood out to him. Without the distractions of its busy natural context, it became both a specimen to examine and a work of art to contemplate. “I remembered what it was like to be a kid in the yard, looking at insects and plants,” Joshua says. “It felt like I was discovering nature again.”

Two years later, more than 500 photos now make up the project Joshua has titled A Photographic Survey of the American Backyard. He makes all of his photographs in a structured, repeatable process. As he details, “I photograph mostly on my back porch in the shade. I use sheets of white foam core from the art supply store, and I place the specimens on the end of a sewing or knitting needle to hold them out away from the background so that I can get as close to a shadowless background as possible.” From there, he positions the subjects to be just right, snaps the photograph, converts the photo to black and white and, finally, adds the Earlybird filter.

Joshua’s creative inspiration comes from his own lifelong curiosity. “I look for interesting forms and the unexpected. I will revisit the same subject several times to see how it changes, dissect seeds and flower buds to examine the structures inside and photograph different specimens of the same species over and over to look at the variation—but really it just comes down to interesting shapes, patterns and forms.” As for what comes next in the series, he has a very clear goal: “A box turtle is right at the top of the list. I get the most excited about things that I have specific childhood memories of, and finding a turtle as a kid was the holy grail.”
+
+
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
clysmian:

hey so I made a comic because I honestly can’t be the only person who thinks about this
+
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

'Judging America' GIFs shine a light on our racial biases
Follow micdotcom 
+
micdotcom:

Watch: Woman wears fat suit on Tinder dates to expose awful double standard


Whether it’s on the job, the red carpet or even a date, a woman with a curvier figure is prone to criticism, if not outrght derision. Not so necessarily for counterparts of the opposite sex, who may still get the big promotion, starring roles and the so-called “hot chick” without cast-iron pecs and six-pack abs. 
In the dating world, this sexist double standard is referenced but seldom seen by those to whom it doesn’t apply. Until now, that is, thanks to a recent hidden-camera social experiment. The folks at Simple Pickup, an admittedly creepy pickup-artist site, make the disparity quite clear. The experiment was gimmicky — find out what happens when a Tinder date shows up much larger in person than they appear in profile photos …
But the results were pretty illuminating.  | Follow micdotcom
+
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
micdotcom:

Hilarious Tumblr Pop Goes the Penguin gives classic books a modern update 
+
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 abandoned places that became hauntingly beautiful works of art
Follow @micdotcom 
+
ppaction:

Queer Chicana feminist writer Gloria Anzaldúa was born 71 years ago today. As an activist and theorist, she pioneered ideas of intersectionality, feminism, queer theory, cultural theory, language, and more.
Happy birthday, Gloria!
via Latinos for Planned Parenthood
+
micdotcom:

YouTube star Sam Pepper thinks sexually harassing women is a hilarious prank

When is it OK to sexually harass women on the street? When it’s for a YouTube video, of course!
That was the apparent thinking of reality-television star turned viral YouTube performer Sam Pepper, who came under fire this past weekend when his latest “prank” showed him sexually harassing women for laughs. The former Big Brother contestant, who has over 2 million YouTube subscribers, asked women on a busy street for directions while secretly grabbing their butts. 
Because nothing’s funnier than touching random women without their permission and catching the whole thing on camera.
The video is problematic for so many reasons | Follow micdotcom
micdotcom:

YouTube star Sam Pepper thinks sexually harassing women is a hilarious prank

When is it OK to sexually harass women on the street? When it’s for a YouTube video, of course!
That was the apparent thinking of reality-television star turned viral YouTube performer Sam Pepper, who came under fire this past weekend when his latest “prank” showed him sexually harassing women for laughs. The former Big Brother contestant, who has over 2 million YouTube subscribers, asked women on a busy street for directions while secretly grabbing their butts. 
Because nothing’s funnier than touching random women without their permission and catching the whole thing on camera.
The video is problematic for so many reasons | Follow micdotcom
micdotcom:

YouTube star Sam Pepper thinks sexually harassing women is a hilarious prank

When is it OK to sexually harass women on the street? When it’s for a YouTube video, of course!
That was the apparent thinking of reality-television star turned viral YouTube performer Sam Pepper, who came under fire this past weekend when his latest “prank” showed him sexually harassing women for laughs. The former Big Brother contestant, who has over 2 million YouTube subscribers, asked women on a busy street for directions while secretly grabbing their butts. 
Because nothing’s funnier than touching random women without their permission and catching the whole thing on camera.
The video is problematic for so many reasons | Follow micdotcom
micdotcom:

YouTube star Sam Pepper thinks sexually harassing women is a hilarious prank

When is it OK to sexually harass women on the street? When it’s for a YouTube video, of course!
That was the apparent thinking of reality-television star turned viral YouTube performer Sam Pepper, who came under fire this past weekend when his latest “prank” showed him sexually harassing women for laughs. The former Big Brother contestant, who has over 2 million YouTube subscribers, asked women on a busy street for directions while secretly grabbing their butts. 
Because nothing’s funnier than touching random women without their permission and catching the whole thing on camera.
The video is problematic for so many reasons | Follow micdotcom